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What Are Medicare Supplement Plans in Arizona?

Updated on: July 1st, 2021

We aim to help you make informed healthcare decisions. While this post may contain links to lead generation forms, this won’t influence our writing. We follow strict editorial standards to give you the most accurate and unbiased information.

While Original Medicare (Medicare Part A, for hospital services, and Part B, for outpatient services) covers many healthcare expenses, it still leaves you responsible for some out-of-pocket costs. Expenses like copayments and deductibles can quickly add up, especially if you have frequent healthcare needs. 

A Medigap policy, also called a Medicare Supplement plan, is additional coverage from a private insurer that helps reduce or eliminate some of the out-of-pocket expenses that Original Medicare doesn’t cover. 

What You Need to Know

A Medicare Supplement plan can help pay healthcare expenses that Original Medicare doesn’t cover. 

To qualify for a Medigap policy, you need to be enrolled in Medicare Part A and B. 

You can choose from 12 Medigap policies in Arizona, including two high-deductible options. 

When Can You Enroll in Medigap? 

You can enroll in Medicare Supplement Insurance in Arizona during your Medigap Open Enrollment Period (OEP).1 It is a six-month period that automatically starts the month that you turn 65 and are enrolled in Medicare Part B. During your Medigap Open Enrollment Period, you can buy any Medicare Supplement plan, and an insurance provider can’t charge you more or deny you coverage for a preexisting condition like COPD. If you decide that the plan you choose isn’t right for you, you can change it during your enrollment period. 

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Once your Medigap Open Enrollment Period ends, enrolling in Medigap becomes more difficult. An insurance provider can charge you a higher premium or reject you because of your preexisting condition. The provider might also require a six-month waiting period before your plan’s coverage goes into effect. 

In certain situations, you can qualify for protections that help you sign up for Medigap outside open enrollment. You have a guaranteed issue right if your current healthcare changes, for instance, if your current plan leaves Medicare.2 With a guaranteed issue right, an insurance provider can’t charge you a higher premium. 

There are other situations, like moving or losing your current coverage, that qualifies you for a Special Enrollment Period.3 During this period, you’ll be able to make changes to your policy, depending on the type of qualifying event you experienced.  

When First Eligible

If you sign up for a Medicare Supplement plan when you’re first eligible, you can’t be charged a higher rate because of a health condition.

In Arizona, you can choose from 12 Medicare Supplement Insurance plans, including two high-deductible options.4 Each lettered plan is the same across different insurers. Plan premiums, deductibles, copayments, and coverage vary, so it’s important to carefully review each plan to decide which one is right for you. 

Plans F, G, and N tend to be the most popular Medigap policies. Note: Plan F isn’t available if you qualified for Medicare after January 1, 2020.

Different Letter Different Coverage

Each letter plan offers different levels of coverage and different monthly costs.

Medicare Supplement Plan F

Plan F has the most comprehensive coverage, but it also carries the highest monthly premium. This plan includes: 

  • Part A coinsurance and hospital costs
  • Part B copays/coinsurance
  • Blood (first 3 pints)
  • Part A hospice
  • Skilled nursing facility
  • Part A deductible
  • Part B deductible
  • Part B excess charges
  • Foreign travel emergency – 80%

Medicare Supplement Plan G

Plan G offers coverage similar to Plan F, but it excludes the Medicare Part B deductible: 

  • Part A coinsurance and hospital costs
  • Part B copays/coinsurance
  • Blood (first 3 pints)
  • Part A hospice
  • Skilled nursing facility
  • Part A deductible
  • Part B excess charges
  • Foreign travel emergency – 80% 

Medicare Supplement Plan N

Plan N doesn’t cover the Medicare Part B deductible or Part B excess charges, but it also has lower premiums than Plan F and Plan G:

  • Part A coinsurance and hospital costs
  • Part B copays/coinsurance
  • Blood (first 3 pints)
  • Part A hospice
  • Skilled nursing facility
  • Part A deductible
  • Foreign travel emergency – 80%

How Do You Choose a Medicare Supplement Plan?

To get the most value out of your Medigap policy in Arizona, you’ll want to choose a plan that covers the types of healthcare expenses you face most often. You might find that a plan with a higher premium actually gives you better value, because it saves you money on your most common healthcare costs. When choosing your Medicare Supplement plan, look for a plan that balances the coverage you need with a premium that you can afford. Medigap plans don’t offer prescription drug coverage. So if you need options look into Medicare Part D plans.

How Much Do Medigap Policies Cost? 

Medigap policies vary in levels of coverage as well as in costs, copayments, and deductibles. The following example shows premium costs for a 65-year-old female in Arizona who doesn’t use tobacco: 

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  • Plan F: $116-$431
  • Plan F High-Deductible: $40-$62
  • Plan G: $98-$397
  • Plan G High-Deductible: $36-$56
  • Plan N: $81-$2995

What If You Want to Change Your Medigap Policy? 

It’s difficult to change your Medicare Supplement plan in Arizona outside of your Medigap Open Enrollment Period unless you have a guaranteed issue right or a Special Enrollment Period. This means it’s important that you carefully research each plan and understand what’s covered and what’s excluded. If you choose the right plan for your needs during your Open Enrollment Period, you won’t have to worry about changing it later on. 

What Are Alternatives to Medicare Supplement? 

If a Medicare Supplement policy isn’t right for you, you might consider Medicare Advantage plans, also known as Medicare Part C.6 They offer the same coverage as Original Medicare, but they’re sold by private insurance companies. Many of these plans include drug coverage, unlike Medigap policies, and they limit your annual out-of-pocket costs. Most Medicare Advantage plans limit coverage to in-network providers.

What Are Medicare Resources in Arizona? 

  • The Arizona State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP) offers free benefits counseling for Medicare beneficiaries. You can call the SHIP assistance helpline to get information about insurance so that you can make well-informed decisions.7 
  • Arizona’s Senior Medicare Patrol helps teach Medicare beneficiaries how to protect personal information, recognize scams, and report healthcare fraud. If you can’t address the fraud by yourself, an SMP volunteer may be able to help you or may refer you to an organization that can help.8 
  • If you need to file a complaint against your insurance company or need information on filing a healthcare appeal, the Arizona Department of Insurance and Financial Institutions can guide you through the process.9 

Next Steps

If a Medicare Supplement plan in Arizona is right for you, be sure to research the available policies. Choose a plan that covers your most frequent healthcare expenses while keeping your out-of-pocket costs down. That way, you’ll be ready when it’s time to sign up. 



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  1. U.S. Government Website for Medicare. “When Can I Buy Medigap?” medicare.gov (accessed February 6, 2021).

  2. U.S. Government Website for Medicare. “Guaranteed Issue Rights.” medicare.gov (accessed February 6, 2021).

  3. U.S. Government Website for Medicare. “Special circumstances (Special Enrollment Periods).” medicare.gov (accessed February 6, 2021).

  4. U.S. Government Website for Medicare. “Supplement Insurance (Medigap) plans in Arizona.” medicare.gov (accessed February 6, 2021).

  5. Supplement Insurance (Medigap) plans in Arizona.”

  6. U.S. Government Website for Medicare. “Medicare Advantage Plans.” medicare.gov (accessed February 6, 2021).

  7. Arizona Department of Economic Security. “Medicare Assistance.” des.az.gov (accessed February 6, 2021).

  8. Medicare Assistance.”

  9. Official Website of the State of Arizona. “Arizona Department of Insurance and Financial Institutions.” insurance.az.gov (accessed February 6, 2021).